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Melba A. Hernandez-Tejada

Melba A. Hernandez-Tejada, Ph.D., DHA is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UTHealth Science Center at Houston, where she is a clinical researcher in the Trauma and Resilience Center (TRC).  Dr. Hernandez-Tejada holds doctoral degrees in Clinical & Health Psychology (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain) and Health Administration (Medical University of South Carolina MUSC), and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Health Disparities at MUSC. She is currently interested in increasing collaborative efforts through inter-professional, integrative approaches to treating high risk populations suffering from mental health conditions, and the impact these conditions have on social interaction, aging in place, and physical health. Her current work reflects these efforts. Specifically, Dr. Hernandez Tejada is researching the benefits of social connection and social support on mental health, while leveraging technology to address barriers to care, particularly among Older Adults and Veterans. Funding for these endeavors has come from the Violence Against Women and Victims of Crime Act funding programs, as well as from the Department of Defense. In addition, Dr. Hernandez-Tejada has engaged in practice-level efforts where she is raising awareness among providers regarding adequate screening, identification, diagnosis and referral of elder mistreatment survivors, coupled with training and provision of evidence-based treatment options for elder abuse victims. She has collaborated and consulted regularly with local, national and international entities regarding elder mistreatment.

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Special Thanks to Judith D. Tamkin

We are sincerely appreciative to Judith D. Tamkin for her gift to help establish the USC Center on Elder Mistreatment’s website. Her deep and personal commitment to eradicating elder abuse is helping to reshape our understanding of elder abuse and ultimately save innumerable older adults from abuse and neglect.