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Sherry Hamby, PhD


Sherry Hamby, Ph.D. is Director of the Life Paths Appalachian Research Center, Research Professor of Psychology at the University of the South, and founding editor of the APA journal Psychology of Violence. A licensed clinical psychologist, Dr. Hamby has worked for more than 20 years on the problem of violence, including front-line crisis intervention and treatment, involvement in grassroots organizations, and research leading to the publication of more than 150 articles and books. She is known for her work on poly-victimization and developing widely used measures of intimate partner violence and youth victimization. Her current primary focus is on resilience and expanding measures for protective factors, with a focus on identifying the under-appreciated strengths in vulnerable and disadvantaged communities. Dr. Hamby has clinical experience with older adult populations in multiple settings, including a nursing home, two inpatient state mental health hospitals, and the Department of Neurology at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Her research has been funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, the John Templeton Foundation, and numerous other agencies. She has served on numerous advisory boards, including the Board of Scientific Counselors at the CDC’s National Center for Injury Control & Prevention. Her awards include the 2017 Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Science of Trauma Psychology from the Trauma Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Hamby’s work has appeared in the Huffington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Psychology Today, and hundreds of other media outlets. Contact: sherry.hamby@sewanee.edu.

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Special Thanks to Judith D. Tamkin

We are sincerely appreciative to Judith D. Tamkin for her gift to help establish the USC Center on Elder Mistreatment’s website. Her deep and personal commitment to eradicating elder abuse is helping to reshape our understanding of elder abuse and ultimately save innumerable older adults from abuse and neglect.